Search results for: batch control

Sep
29

Batch vs. Continuous Control and Optimization – Part 4

Batch and fed-batch reactors are designed so that the product concentration is always increasing in the reaction phase of the cycle whereas continuous reactors are designed to hold a constant product concentration. These fundamental differences have enormous implications in terms of composition control. Conventional control of product concentration in a batch and fed-batch reactor is …

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Sep
23

Batch vs. Continuous Control and Optimization – Part 3

Reactors are the pivotal unit operation that sets plant capacity and efficiency besides product quality. Reactors provide good examples of the common and distinctive opportunities for the PID control of batch, fed-batch, and continuous unit operations. Here we examine pressure, temperature, and endpoint control. The pressure control of batch, fed-batch, and continuous reactors may have …

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Sep
16

Batch vs. Continuous Control and Optimization – Part 2

Batch and continuous temperature loops can have vastly different responses. Fortunately, temperature loops have a characteristic early in the response that enables a fast identification of the process dynamics. The resulting models can be used for process control improvement, tuning, and rapid deployment of models for plantwide simulations. Temperature is the most important common measurement …

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Sep
08

Batch vs. Continuous Control and Optimization – Part 1

Feedback control systems play an important role in batch and continuous unit operations. What are the similarities and differences in the process response, tuning, control strategies, and advanced process control opportunities? What can continuous control specialists learn from batch control experts and vice versa? Is it possible there are some fundamental principles unifying our solutions …

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May
02

Applications – Batch Chemical Reactor Control

As mentioned in my previous blogs on the book Control Loop Foundation – Batch and Continuous Processes, the application examples included in Chapter 16 illustrate the various ways single loop and multi-loop control techniques may be used automate plant control. The second workshop exercise in this chapter allows the reader to explore the different features …

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Feb
16

Control Classes – Dubai

In late November, 2014 I traveled to Dubai to teach the Control Loop Foundation class. This class is based on the book Control Loop Foundation – Batch and Continuous Processes and is a standard class offered by Emerson’s education department. In this class the students used the book’s web site to perform the workshops that …

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May
05

Control Loop Foundation Reprint

A book goes through many reviews and edits before it can be published. Still, it is very difficult for the authors and reviewers to catch all the typo’s in the original text and those that are introduced during the type setting process (formatting for publication). ISA recently notified me that the book that Mark Nixon …

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Nov
04

Utilizing DeltaV Advanced Control Innovations

Several Meet the Expects workshops are schedule on the last day of Emerson Exchange. As part of this effort, Willy Wojsznis and I co-hosted a workshop this year titled Utilizing DeltaV Advanced Control Innovations to Improve Control Performance. In this workshop we explore and discuss innovative features of the DeltaV PID and embedded Advanced Control …

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May
27

Commissioning PI Control – Integrating Process

When the control objective is to maintain the controlled parameter of an integrating process at setpoint under all operating conditions, then using PI (proportional-integral or proportional plus reset) controller, it is possible to automatically compensate for changes in disturbance inputs and maintain the controlled parameter at setpoint. However, the application of PI control to an …

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May
20

Surge Tank Control

Intermediate liquid storage tanks (surge tanks) are commonly installed between processing areas of the plant. Under normal operating conditions, these storage buffers allow each process area to be operated independently of the other process areas. Any imbalance in the area production rates within a plant will be reflected by a change in level of the …

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