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Apr
04

Control Loop Foundation Class – Manila, Philippines

As I mentioned in a previous blog, Emerson’s education department has established class (9025) that is based on the book Control Loop Foundation that Mark Nixon and I co-authored. At the invitation of Emerson’s development manager in the Philippines, I traveled in March to Manila and taught the 9025 class two times. A total of 40 engineers involved in product development and product support attended this class. The class is designed to be a mixture of lecture and workshops in which the students get hands on experience. Normally the class is scheduled for 4 ½ day. However, for the training in Manila the material for each class was condensed into two very full days.

It was my first time to visit the Philippines and I was impressed by Manila and the people I meet in and out of the class room. Manila is a large city with over 10 million people and thus has traffic jams comparable to those that are common in Los Angeles, New York and other large cities. Many areas of Manila are quite modern as illustrated in the picture below – taken from my hotel window.

Manila_Philippines.jpg

The education center in Manila is located on the 32nd floor of the building used by Emerson Process Management. A variety of classes are periodically scheduled at this facility to support customer training needs in Asia Pacific. My job in Manila was made easy since the lead instructor in the education department coordinated all preparations for the class. Thus, I all I had to do was focus on teaching the class. The students made it a real pleasure to teach the class. As illustrated below, the education class room was very well equipped.

In both of the Manila classes the students completed the first 11 workshops contained in the book. These workshops address the most common tools and techniques used by control engineers in the process industry – process characterization (3 different workshops), feedback control, tuning, feedforward, cascade control, override control, split range control, valve position control, ratio control. Also, in the class I briefly discussed and reviewed the eight application workshops included in the book. These application workshops are designed to illustrate how basic control techniques may be combined to address a variety of process requirements. The students will be able to explore these application workshops as they have time in the future by going to the book web site. The students seemed to enjoy and benefit from the workshops as shown in the picture below taken as one class performed a workshops.

The education department in Austin, Texas has schedule a 9025 class that I will teach the week of September 12th. If you are interested in attending this class, then you can register for the class through the education department web site.